The caller from the monitoring service will identify themselves as being from Ring, since that’s who your business relationship is with, but they actually work for a third-party company that Ring contracts with: Rapid Response Monitoring Services. This is a common arrangement for home security systems. Nest, for example, contracts with MONI Smart Security (which is now doing business as Brinks Home Security). Alarm.com is another major third-party monitoring service.

With home and away modes, you're able to customize entry and exit delays up to two minutes before the alarm goes off, giving you enough time to leave the house after arming and enter the access code on the keypad upon returning home. When an event is detected, you'll get a notification on your phone, and the Ring app will display a countdown giving you the configured period of time to disarm the system before the alarm goes off. If you fail to enter the keypad code or disarm from the Ring app within the allowed time, the base station will emit a very loud beeping sound, and if you are signed up for professional monitoring, authorities will be notified.


Since I’m assuming you will want to live stream often to check on your kids, I would recommend a wired security camera. The original Canary is a good option as is Arlo Q. Both will allow you to live stream from anywhere. Original Canary does not offer two-way audio for free, Arlo Q does, something to consider if you want to be able to talk to your childcare provider or children using the camera. Both cameras include free cloud storage.
Ring is owned by Amazon, so we fully expected to be able to have our security system chatting it up with our Amazon Alexa and other smart home devices. But that’s not the case, at least not yet. We spoke to Mike Harris, Ring’s President of Ring Solutions, and he said that Ring wanted to focus on security first and foremost, as well as getting people comfortable with the system, before introducing integration with other products. But users can expect integration that already exists to be activated soon.

Pricing for add-on components is pretty much in line with what you'll pay if you have a SimpliSafe or Abode system. Extra contact sensors are $20 each, another motion sensor will cost you $30, and a range extender goes for $25. Additional devices including a Smoke/CO detector ($40), a Flood/Freeze detector ($35), and a Dome Siren ($30) are not yet available.
The white base station is the brains of the system. It measures 1.4 by 6.6 by 6.6 inches (HWD) and has a 1.5-inch LED ring and a speaker on top, and a USB port and a LAN port around back, joined by a pairing button, a reset button, and Wi-Fi and power indicators. The base contains circuitry that supports numerous wireless protocols including dual-band 802.11n Wi-Fi, Z-Wave, Zigbee, Bluetooth 4.1, and LTE cellular as a backup if you subscribe to the Ring Protect Plus plan (more on this later). It also has an internal backup battery that will provide up to 24 hours of power in the event of a power loss, and a loud 105dB internal siren.

P.S. My house was broken once when we was abroad, without breaking a door or a window. In fact, the thieves entered thru the front door without breaking anything – the lock was just magically opened. Because we know we didn’t lose any key, the assumption is that they used lock picking technique or a lock picking gun (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snap_gun) – So I don’t think it’s good to assume thieves are dumb (But i’m not in the USA so maybe you have different kind of thieves ;-] )..

Hi Rose, AMAZING review! I’ve been struggling with the decision making process with all the options out there. I had purchased an Arlo indoor camera a year ago and faced it out the window but got glare that blocked the view outside occasionally as the sun moved throughout the day. You said you turned off night vision when facing camera out the window but did you have any glare issues or ideas on how to resolve? (perhaps the newer models are better now) I returned the Arlo because if this but need to buy something and would consider Arlo for other benefits if glare can be reduced. I’m concerned about short battery life due to cold winter temps (Colorado) but I love the idea of solar option on the Arlo Pro outdoor. Advice?
Ring is finally getting ready to release its full home security system — an alarm, keypad, and array of sensors that monitor a house while you’re asleep or away. The product, called Ring Alarm, was initially announced (and supposed to come out) last October. But after a lawsuit, a lengthy delay, and a rebranding, Ring says it’s now just about ready. Sales for the security system start today, and the product is supposed to begin shipping next month.
2. If you want monitoring of video, check out SimpliSafe. They won’t monitor your motion events, but rather your sensors. If your sensors show an alarm event, they can log into your camera to gather video evidence. They offer what’s called ‘video verification.’ The downside to SimpliSafe, when compared to the options presented in this article, is that it lacks home automation. The system does support Nest Thermostats, Alexa, Google Assistant, and the August Smart Lock Pro, but it doesn’t offer an automation engine. Also, integrations are not free, which is in contrast to what abode, Ring, and Nest offer. Finally, SimpliSafe does not have an outdoor camera though they did recently release a video doorbell and have plans to launch an outdoor camera. abode, Nest, and Ring all lack professional monitoring of video and the cameras are not tied to the alarm as motion sensors. Camera motion activated events are self-monitored.

The one thing Apple fans might miss is HomeKit support, which isn't included in Ring Alarm and still has yet to come several other Ring products for which HomeKit support was promised long ago. Ring declined to offer any new details on its HomeKit plans, but acknowledged that customers continue to request it and promised the company is still working on it.
Oco Pro Bullet is weatherproof, has an SD card, cloud storage, night vision, smart motion detection, and records in FHD 1080p. It can also work in a wide range of temperatures, from -22 °F – 140 °F (-30 °C – 60 °C). But it has one massive limitation: viewing angle. Unfortunately, it only offers an 85-degree viewing angle. Also, the indoor version fell flat on many of its promised features. While the outdoor camera uses different hardware, the indoor experience left me feeling leery towards Oco’s ability to build a quality camera.

Once you're logged in, follow the straightforward prompts to connect each accessory. This was one of the easiest security system setups I've ever encountered; literally pull the battery tab on the battery-powered door/window sensor and motion sensor and plug in the base station, the keypad and the Z-Wave range extender, and they automatically connect to the app.

A Ring home security system can get pricey, as you need to pay upfront for the devices. The plans are straightforward, so you won’t run into any confusion there. The low monthly cost of the plans makes the premium features accessible for any budget, especially if you only have one or two Ring devices. The real question is whether Ring offers enough value compared to the other systems on the market. If you’re willing to take a more DIY approach with installation and you don’t mind a lack of home automation features, then the Ring is a contender.


Other Devices Image Sensor, Smart Switch, Extra Siren, Temperature, Humidity & Light Sensor, Water Leak Sensor, iota Smart Doorbell, Range Extender, Smart Deadbolt Lock (Nest x Yale) Video Doorbell (Pro, Elite, 2), Spotlight Cam, Floodlight Cam, Stick Up Cam, Chime, Chime Pro, Solar Panel, Solar Sign, Ring Beams, Smoke & CO Listener, First Alert Smoke/CO Alarm, Flood and Freeze Sensor, Third-Party Z-Wave Locks Satellite Siren, Smart Switch, Yard Sign
Arming the system Away starts a 60-second countdown, delaying the armed state to give you time to exit the home without tripping any of the sensors. Opening a protected door while the system is armed also triggers a 60-second countdown, this one is to give you time to reach the keypad to disarm the system. If a sensor installed on a window is tripped while the system is armed, the alarm will go off instantly. That’s sensible: No one should be entering or leaving the home through a window while the system is armed.
I am using Wyze Cam on my front porch right now in addition to Nest Hello. I actually have all push notifications turned off, I just use it to check in on things. I’ve had it out there since June I believe, and it’s still kicking. Of course, my porch does provide added protection. I have a friend who mounted his under an eave using the same casing and his is still kicking too, even though it’s more exposed.
Unfortunately, though I purchased the Solar Panel version, the camera did not ship with Solar Panel installation instructions. The Solar Panel itself had an instruction pamphlet, but it’s picture book style, which is not my favorite. I decided to ignore all instructions and guess at the install, which wasn’t a good idea. After installation, the camera’s video feed kept flickering in and out (a problem which I have yet to resolve) so I went back through my install steps to see if I had messed up along the way. I had. I found Solar Panel installation instructions online which I recommend and followed step-by-step.
After the battery is charged, you can move the camera to a new location, so long as it’s within your WiFi’s range. The camera will work using battery power alone, or you can continue to use it plugged into a power outlet. Since the launch of Canary Flex, Canary has also promised a 4G LTE mount, but they haven’t, and probably won’t deliver. If cellular connectivity is something you’re interested in, I suggest you look into Reolink Go or Arlo Go.
Hi Rose, I’m intrigued that you have a traditional alarm system but also one of these new wireless versions. Are they integrated? Can they be? I haven’t looked at the Ring, abode, and Nest systems because I have am old-fashioned standard system that came wired into my home. I’d love to integrate it with my Ring cameras and doorbell cam, or even get one of the new wireless voice-activated bases or keypads. Can that be done with any system today?
Some jurisdictions require permits for monitored alarm systems, and Ring will guide you based on the address where you're using Ring Alarm. In some areas, Ring can obtain the permit on your behalf once you pay required fees, but in other jurisdictions you'll need to handle it on your own. Either way, once you have your permit, you can enter the permit number and expiration date in the Ring app to make all parties aware that your system is properly registered. My town does not require permits, so I did not need to go through this step.
I actually bought mine from Home Depot. So Ring has some work to do with this product as it was put out into the market too early with some engineering issues. First off I will say that during the DAY the camera works just as good as the ring doorbell. I get consistent motion alerts in the Daytime in the zones I set up with the camera. However during the night its a different story. I set up the camera on the soffit of my garage which is 8 feet from the ground. Ring specifically says that you CAN mount on the soft (under the roof line) of a house, however when mounting the camera the installation instructions say that the sensor under the camera (the big globe white thing) must be parallel to the ground. Unfortunately Ring poorly engineered the camera where the vertical axis of the arm for the camera would not allow me to adjust the camera angle any higher so that the sensor would be horizontal to the ground. Due to this the camera and floodlights will not sense me during the night until your 5-8 feet away from the thing which is totally counter productive to what I bought the whole camera floodlight combo for. I am still currently working with Ring customer support on this but it might end up with me making another hole in my garage to mount it on the side but I do not want to do this until I get a firm answer from Ring that this will work. As far as connectivity and video quality I have no issues. But to sum this review up DO NOT BUY IF YOUR MOUNTING TO A SOFFIT 8 FOOT OR LOWER. I will update my review when necessary.
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