Arlo Go is yet another Arlo camera. It’s an Arlo Pro plus 4G. The big catch is that a cellular plan via Verizon is needed as it doesn’t work with WiFi. It does come with 15 data minutes to send 15 minutes worth of video to the cloud for free. Once you’ve used those minutes, you’ll need to buy more time. Data plans start at $4.99/month for 15 data minutes and go up to $32.99/month for 225 data minutes. Arlo Go sells for $429.99 on Amazon or 399.99 from Verizon ($349.99 if you sign a 2-year contract).
Ring's Neighborhood is a cool feature that lets you share recorded events with neighbors who have joined the Neighborhood. You'll receive alerts when a neighbor posts a video and when there's fire and police activity in your neighborhood. The Events tab takes you to a screen where you can view a list of all camera and alarm events including sensor activity, arming and disarming times, and motion detection. Below the Neighbors and Events tabs are windows with live views of each installed Ring video doorbell and camera.
My indoor Canary is self-sufficient, and that is exactly what I want in a home security camera. Flex has yet to provide that same experience. I’ve had to physically interact with the device multiple times to get it to reconnect to my internet. Also, the geofencing feature is inaccurate, often marking me away while home and vice versa. As for power loss notifications? They’re hit or miss.

For customers with Ring Alarm, this means you should be able to set your new Stick Up Cam to record automatically if something trips your security system. Adding Alexa should offer the opportunity for simple voice commands -- hopefully things like, "Alexa, show me my living room camera" that you'd then be able to see on your Echo Show or other screen-enabled Alexa device. 
The Alarm system does not have as many bells and whistles as Nest’s system, nor does it have some of the conveniences Nest provides. But at $199 for the starter bundle, which includes the necessary hub, a keypad, a motion detector, a contact sensor for doors or windows, and a range extender, plus $10 per month for professional monitoring, Ring’s system is significantly cheaper than Nest Secure (which was just recently reduced to $399 for its starter kit) and is one of the least expensive home security systems you can purchase.
4) Motion detector- again people say they are large ; but they are SMALLER than hard wired motion detectors I have - the differenc is the hard wired ones are embeddded itnot the drywall (but you can do this with the smaller ring detectors Too if you want. You can buy a plate to finish off the drywall edge of the small “cubby:” you create OR just buy some trim at Home Depot that matches your current baseboard or ceiling/door trim , buy a plastic miter box for $10 and make 45 degree cuts and you have your custom tight frame ready to paint (ANYONE can do this !) and you can locate the motion detectors anywhere you have a drywall wall ! Compared to any wireless motion detector than nest they arent that large -nest ones are 50% more $ and they are nots o small as to go un noticed anyway !
I want to say first this is one of the best reviews I have ever seen. It had me reading and viewing the videos all the way to the bottom. Thanks for doing this. I am a retired policemans wife and wanted a good camera. My only problem is internet, I have,a hotspot for internet. I purchased the ring flood light and Ring customer service told me it wouldn’t work or if it did only for a few days. Well It has been a week now and still working. (not yelling) MY QUESTION IS: Does any of the above work off a hotspot wifi without a router? Since I have no router and Ring does work with hotspot. I did purchases TP Link wifi extender. The device health is Good (RSSI) 46 to 53 range. I am kinda Pretty good with technical issues, but nowhere knowledgeable as lots of people. I do work for a judge he’s an appeal judge and anything goes wrong with the computers phones or anything I take care of all of it although I am his JA which is judicial assistant I put in all the orders in issue writs and stuff like that. Thanks in advance for all your help. Also thanks so much for the review.
I would go beyond resolution and consider what you want the camera to do. My favorite outdoor camera is Arlo Pro, but a battery-powered outdoor camera will come with its own challenges. In my front yard, I need 24/7 continuous recording which is Nest, but I can’t deal with the way the giant wire looks on Nest Outdoor so I used Nest Cam Indoor filming through a window for a couple of years, which also has its own challenges, until I swapped out my Ring Doorbell for Nest Hello. Nest Hello is Nest’s video doorbell and it can record continuously.
It would have been convenient to have a device like a key fob for the Ring Alarm, as running to find the keypad or navigating the app to turn off the alarm takes a few seconds too long, but one does not currently exist. However, arming and disarming the system is relatively straightforward.  I just had to dig through the paper manual to figure out how to correctly enter my PIN to change modes.
Second, Ring sells a contact sensor. The two-piece sensor can be placed on doors or windows and will notify you of open/close movements. Third, they sell a pet-friendly motion detector. Fourth, they sell a range extender. The range extender is the only sensor that requires AC power, but it also includes 24-hour battery backup. The Range Extender is used to boost the signal emitted by your Base Station to help eliminate dead zones.
Some jurisdictions require permits for monitored alarm systems, and Ring will guide you based on the address where you're using Ring Alarm. In some areas, Ring can obtain the permit on your behalf once you pay required fees, but in other jurisdictions you'll need to handle it on your own. Either way, once you have your permit, you can enter the permit number and expiration date in the Ring app to make all parties aware that your system is properly registered. My town does not require permits, so I did not need to go through this step.
Whether you opt for one of the wired or battery-powered Ring Spotlight Cams, you’ll get an impressive camera that effectively fills a necessary niche: providing security for yards, carports, and other spots around the perimeter of homes that become particularly vulnerable after dark. While it will work great as a standalone camera, it will shine as part of more comprehensive security set up with other Ring devices—I used it in conjunction with the Ring Doorbell and a Stick Up Cam—for seamless 360-degree surveillance of your property.
Arming the system Away starts a 60-second countdown, delaying the armed state to give you time to exit the home without tripping any of the sensors. Opening a protected door while the system is armed also triggers a 60-second countdown, this one is to give you time to reach the keypad to disarm the system. If a sensor installed on a window is tripped while the system is armed, the alarm will go off instantly. That’s sensible: No one should be entering or leaving the home through a window while the system is armed.
If you’ve been following along, you know that when I face wire management issues or I have to use a power drill, I call my dad. Drilling into brick isn’t easy. Even for dads, apparently. In the end, I wasn’t sure I wanted to keep the camera anyway. What if I don’t like the camera? Do I want holes in my brick? With that in mind, we decided to use a piece of industrial strength 3M adhesive on the power adapter (the power adapter weighs about 4.5 oz) and a regular 3M strip on the camera wall plate. Everything seemed fine at first. At about 10 o’clock that night, I heard a loud crash. Thankfully, the camera was fine, but the power adapter proved to be too heavy for the adhesive.
After I finished installing this device I found myself having issues with it for the first 3 days where sensors will go offline for no reason almost every day; suddenly after day 4 maybe, all of the issues disappeared and the system was now working like a well-oiled machine. I reached out to Ring support team and they informed me that there was an automatic update that the brain device was going to perform on its own and that would solve all of the issues I was experiencing. They were indeed 100% correct, after just a few days the system was doing exactly what it was supposed to be doing all along. No issues, no dropped devices, a happy customer here now. If you end up choosing this system and experience issues during the first 3-4 days, please wait a few days for your system to automatically update itself to the latest software and you’ll see the issues magically go away.
The decision to separate the system’s brains—the base station—from the keypad is smart: It allows you to place the larger base station somewhere out of the way and put the smaller keypad near an entry door, where it’s easy to access. You can also deploy more than one keypad—one at the front door, one at the back, and one on your bedside table, for instance. Putting the base station somewhere other than near an entry door also enhances the system’s overall security: If burglars can’t find it quickly, they can’t disable the system.
As is the case with the Nest Secure system, the Ring Alarm does not support IFTTT applets or react to Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant voice commands. A Ring spokesperson has confirmed that support for voice commands and many other third-party devices is in the pipeline, and will include support for the soon-to-be-released new Ring Stick Up Cam, as well interoperability with other Ring devices.

Unlike the other options, Ring cameras don’t integrate with the security system. Sure you can monitor them all using a single mobile app, but there is no “if this, then that” relationship. If your alarm sounds, your cameras will not record. If your cameras detect motion, they won’t trigger your alarm. However, there is one major benefit to using Ring cameras: If you pay $10 per month, you will gain access to cloud storage and professional monitoring with cellular backup.
Hi Rose! Thank you for such an informative article. Unfortunately, I’m reading due to the fact that my street was just the victim of car break-ins overnight. I am curious to know what your opinion on the night vision (inside and out) for each of the cameras is. I currently have the older Logitech Alert cameras, but their night vision isn’t the greatest so I really couldn’t make out the burglars or the vehicles they were in. I have been leaning on Ring doorbell/stick ups, but no 24/7 recording is almost scaring me away.
While you aren’t required to purchase professional monitoring, both Ring and Nest offer you the option of doing so. The purchase of 24/7 monitoring gives you peace of mind that professionals are keeping an eye on your home security on your behalf. The Nest Secure offers professional monitoring for $19 a month if you sign up for a three-year contract, or you can pay month-to-month for $29 a month. The Ring Alarm offers various plans that allow the user to pay by the month or by the year. The Protect Basic Plan is available for $3 a month or $30 a year per camera, while the Protect Plus Plan is $10 a month or $100 a year, and the service can be applied to an unlimited number of security cameras. It also includes professional monitoring.
Mair, I installed the Spotlight Cam and have been running it for a few days. I updated the content above, and I’m working on a separate review (which I will publish after Thanksgiving). So far it’s fine. There are some limitations with the Solar version, which is the same as the Battery version. One, you can’t create Activity Zones, that is limited to the Wired version only. Two, you can’t schedule the lights. The lights will turn on when motion is detected and you can trigger them manually, but that’s it. I’d say that the motion detector performance is on par with the Ring Video Doorbell. It includes the same feature that allows you to adjust motion sensitivity. There is no way to weed out false alarms, and sometimes I get alerts if the wind blows too hard. The camera wakes up fast, faster than my doorbell. The video quality is just okay. It doesn’t look like 1080p to me, it looks like 720p. Two-way talk works well. I was surprised that the cameras don’t play together. For example, if my doorbell detects an alert, I can’t trigger Spotlight to record. Spotlight doesn’t work with IFTTT so it’s not possible through their service, and though it works with Stringify, you can’t create this sort of relationship between cameras using Stringify. What else do you want to know?
I’ve settled on continuous video for my outdoor cameras too. Obviously, I use Nest for that. For indoor cameras, Arlo Q is also an option. For $9.99/month, you can add continuous cloud recording. SpotCam also has continuous cloud recording, but we haven’t tried it. Of course, there are other options where you store the footage locally, but then the trouble becomes finding usable footage when you need it!
I would go beyond resolution and consider what you want the camera to do. My favorite outdoor camera is Arlo Pro, but a battery-powered outdoor camera will come with its own challenges. In my front yard, I need 24/7 continuous recording which is Nest, but I can’t deal with the way the giant wire looks on Nest Outdoor so I used Nest Cam Indoor filming through a window for a couple of years, which also has its own challenges, until I swapped out my Ring Doorbell for Nest Hello. Nest Hello is Nest’s video doorbell and it can record continuously.
The camera connects to the included wall mount using a ball socket. If you’re installing on brick or another hard surface, you’ll need to drill and insert wall anchors. If you’re installing your camera onto a wooden surface, you can use the included screws and screwdriver to secure the mount. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to keep Spotlight Cam so both options seemed like rather permanent solutions. I decided to create the most unattractive, temporary solution.
As a Contributing Editor for PCMag, John Delaney has been testing and reviewing monitors, TVs, PCs, networking and smart home gear, and other assorted hardware and peripherals for almost 20 years. A 13-year veteran of PC Magazine's Labs (most recently as Director of Operations), John was responsible for the recruitment, training and management of t... See Full Bio
I’ve settled on continuous video for my outdoor cameras too. Obviously, I use Nest for that. For indoor cameras, Arlo Q is also an option. For $9.99/month, you can add continuous cloud recording. SpotCam also has continuous cloud recording, but we haven’t tried it. Of course, there are other options where you store the footage locally, but then the trouble becomes finding usable footage when you need it!
The system supports the First Alert Z-Wave Smoke/CO detector which is also compatible with the Ring Response service. Soon, it will also work with the Dome Siren. Ring has also added compatibility with several Z-Wave locks including those made by Yale, Schlage, Kwikset, and DanaLock to Ring Alarm’s compatibility list. The locks connect to Ring Alarm’s Base Station and can be controlled using the Ring App. From there, you can lock and unlock your door, share your door’s access with trusted family members and friends, and issue temporary access codes to dog walkers or babysitters.
Meet Oco next generation Full HD Home Monitoring Meet Oco next generation Full HD Home Monitoring Camera with SD Card and Cloud Storage. Monitor everything you care about: your home children pets elderly parents business etc. Setup Oco2 in less than 60 seconds and access Full HD video remotely with our App. No Monthly Fees required to activate ...  More + Product Details Close
×